We Choose To Go To The Moon

But why, some say, the moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask why climb the highest mountain? Why, 35 years ago, fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas?

We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone,

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Emotional Intelligence

In 2015 I was part of a massive layoff at my former company and if you’ve ever been through a layoff you know how emotional it can be. This layoff was my first and it devastated me. The layoffs were part of a ‘restructuring’ that the company was going through and even though I wasn’t laid off because of my performance, I felt like I was worthless. To give you some context, here is an entry from my journal on 7/15/2015, the day that I found out I was laid off.

“Just got fired. What the […].”

…and then the day after:

“I don’t feel like doing […].

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Delayed Gratification

 

Lately I’ve been fascinated with the concept of delayed gratification. The basic idea that intrigues me is this: People who have the ability to delay gratification are more successful in life. Some people are naturally good at delaying gratification and some of us, including me, are not.

Delaying gratification is the ability to wait for a later outcome that is better than the immediate outcome.

Check out my thoughts in the supplemental video below. I give a little detail about the part that delayed gratification plays in my life and how I’m still learning to apply it.

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Posted in Delayed Gratification, Financial Independence
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The Real Cuba

“I feel like I’m in a movie.” I said after I cleared the staunch immigration and customs that charged me a 100% tariff on my bags. It was warm and humid outside. The salty night air was wetting my face and I could see the palm trees illuminated by the light of the moon. I looked around in astonishment because I couldn’t believe that I was actually experiencing the real Cuba.

Although I was in Cuba legally, I was there without the knowledge of the American government. According to www.travel.state.gov  “Tourist travel to Cuba remains prohibited.

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What Is Financial Independence?

The responsible way to handle money is to get a paycheck, pay the bills, and spend the rest. As long as I do it in that order I am being financially responsible. USA Today reported on October 9, 2016 that Nearly 7 in 10 Americans have less than $1,000 in savings. So I’m pretty sure that’s how most of us think about money.

That was how I thought before I learned that money is a tool and I was using it all wrong. Yes, it’s a huge part of our lives but should it be our life? 

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Building Trust — Part IV: Follow-through

Follow-through is the traceability between what I say and what I do. It’s that traceability throughout a situation from beginning to end which builds trust. Many times I’ve found that this is difficult see though. I don’t always define a clear goal at the beginning of the situation so when I get to the end, it’s hard to tell if I’ve delivered on my promise or not.

So far I’ve discussed three of the key disciplines that I use to develop trust:

I plan for this to be my final post on building trust.

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Building Trust — Part III: Simplicity

This post about simplicity is Part III in our series on building trust. We’ve learned that you can build trust through listening and vulnerability so far. Both of those are passive behaviors. Now let’s learn about the active behavior of simplicity.

Simple, concise, and straightforward are all words that I use to describe great communication. As the saying goes,

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Building Trust — Part II: Vulnerability

This is Part II in our series on building trust which focuses on vulnerability. In Part I we talked about the importance of trust between Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, the first men to summit Mount Everest and how that relates to any other trusting relationship. They climbed the highest mountain in the world while roped together. They hoped that if one of them slipped, the other could react and save him. We learned that in order to achieve great things, we must have great trust and by giving the gift of attention to others by listening to them,

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Building Trust — Part I: Listening

This is the first post in a series about building trust. Listening is the most important way to build trust which we will discover throughout the rest of this post.

Check out the photo above of Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, the first climbers to summit Mount Everest on May 29, 1953. Mount Everest looms 29,029 ft above sea level where it’s impossible for humans to survive for more than a few hours. The air at that altitude makes it almost impossible for a climbers to breath. The two climbers, one British and one Nepalese had very little in common except for their passion for climbing. 

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